10 Proven Ways to Improve Your Brain Health Through Walking

| September 21, 2020 | 0 Comments

Walking is perhaps the easiest way to add exercise to your weight loss efforts and to take care of your health. With just 30 minutes of walking on a daily basis, most people can improve cardiovascular fitness, reduce excess body fat, strengthen bones and enhance muscle power.

Walking for Health and Fitness

It might surprise you to hear that something as simple as walking can actually improve your brainpower. It doesn’t even have to be full-on power walking! Even a twenty- or thirty-minute walk during your lunch break can have a positive impact on your brain. Here are eight ways science has proven that walking is excellent for your brain.

Walking Helps Lower Your Risk of Depression

Walking is an excellent way to improve your mental health. A 2018 study showed that any kind of moderate aerobic exercise like brisk walking can boost your brain health and lower your risk of developing depression by a third.

Walking Improve Your Cognitive Function

A number of studies have shown that the magic amount of twenty to thirty minutes of daily aerobic exercise, such as walking, improves cognitive function and memory.

Walking Stimulates Endorphins

Just ten minutes of walking is enough to start your brain releasing endorphins, the brain chemicals that lower stress, boost your mental health, and make you feel good. You’ve heard of the runner’s high? Well, you can get a similar positive rush from a brisk walk!

Walking Releases the Brain’s Magic Protein

Brain-Derived Neurotrophic Factor (BDNF) has been dubbed the brain’s ‘magic protein’ as it helps to rewire and build new neural pathways. Scientists believe it can even help lower your risk of Alzheimer’s Disease. And cardiovascular exercise is an easy way to stimulate the production of BDNF and keep your brain in peak condition.

Walking Lowers Physical and Mental Fatigue

A 2008 study by the University of Georgia found that just three sessions a week of a low-intensity exercise like walking can reduce fatigue levels by as much as 65 percent.

Family of 3 Walking for Brain Health

Walking Builds Hippocampus Strength

Your hippocampus is the key part of the brain for forming and storing memories. Research has shown that even brief walks can actually increase the size and efficiency of your hippocampus.

Walking Improves Creativity

Artists, writers, and philosophers have long known the importance of walking for clearing blocked creativity and getting inspiration flowing again. Science can now back this up with a 2014 study by Stanford University showing that walking increases your creative output by up to sixty percent.

Walking Increases Blood Flow to the Brain

Blood is vital for every organ in your body, not least of all, your brain. That magic twenty minutes is all it takes to increase the blood flow to your brain to keep it active and healthy.

Walking Leads to Better Sleep and A Clear Mind

One of the very few things, other than sedatives, which help with insomnia is a walk. Be it a morning walk or a walk in the evening, it is known to help with insomnia and improve the quality of sleep, so that the person wakes up fresh and with a clear, active mind the next day.

Walking Has Been Shown to Slow Degenerative Diseases of the Brain

There are a number of degenerative brain disorders that can be prevented or the symptoms slowed down and reduced by regular walks. In patients with memory loss due to trauma, dementia due to a genetic predisposition, walks are prescribed as part of their treatment.

Walking Shoes

Walking is a great form of physical activity for people. It’s easy on those who are overweight, elderly and even those who haven’t worked out in a while. Besides many other benefits, walking improves the overall functions and activity of the brain. It helps improve memory, learning, behavioral responses and functions. You can’t really go wrong with taking a simple walk. Get started today!

 

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Category: Fitness and Exercise

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